Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Cats and Other Animals’ Category

Stoutly hewing to our 2017 Viewing Resolution: playful piffle only, no beheadings/ no politics!– the cats and I recently gathered on the sofa to watch the Secret Life of Pets. While derivative and predictable, this is also a charming movie–cheeky characterizations of dogs, cats, hamsters–and their loving relationships with their humans. My favorite was the chic poodle, Leonard.

See, we are in trendy Brooklyn, and all the hipster humans are taking leave of their beloved pets to go to work. In Leonard’s apartment, decorous classical music (Vivaldi) is playing on the sound system. His elegant owner gives him a pat, and tells him to be a good dog—and off he goes. The door shuts.

BAM! Leonard flips the music to HEAD BANGING SCREAMING HEAVY METAL and goes K-K-K-KRAZY, bucking and dancing like his back ain’t got no bone!

And then there is Buddy the dachshund, who has discovered an interesting use for the Cuisinart stand mixer: masseuse!

Plot happens: Wild and Wacky car chases, trucks speeding across the Brooklyn Bridge (“No Sleep Till Brooklyn!”), some very VERY BAD CATS, and a ferocious crazed bunny. And an alligator!

But in the end, you will be relieved to hear, everything turns out all right, and when the Brooklynites return to their spiffy apartments that evening, all the pets are home, rapturously greeting their humans. Our view draws back to show the glowing windows in each lovely old building, pets and humans silhouetted in their various ways of embracing each other. Yes, a little labored, a little silly. But charming enough. And a movie that ends with such a loving vision will do very well. AND beheading-free, as I mentioned.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

By way of restoring the soul between riveting BUT HORRIFYING episodes of Game of Thrones, I have been watching a nature series called Africa, narrated by—of course–Sir David Attenborough (who is now about a hundred and five or so). One astonishingly fabulous vision after another—I found that my jaw was quite literally dropping open in sheer amazement. As for instance, at the huge panorama of a million million pale pink flamingos feeding in the strange soda lakes of the Great Rift Valley. Or, a giraffe battle in the Namib desert—the giraffes whip each other with their long stately necks in an oddly beautiful dance (except that both victor and loser are bloody and bruised afterwards).

There was a particularly charming scene, filmed at night, showing a group of black rhinos—normally solitary creatures—who gathered at a waterhole, appearing to greet each other with great good cheer. One young male, having been dismissed by haughty female, reappeared bedecked with an antelope skull, the long horns forming a sort of perky hat. WELL! She was captivated, and a rhino dalliance ensued. Not perhaps a very graceful proceeding, but there, we can’t all be Baryshnikovs.

Except the springboks, that is—they outdo any human dancer. There is even a name for their acrobatic bounding about: pronking. As Sir David says, it’s hard not to think they are leaping for the very joy of it.

Among many breathtaking scenes—good lord, the Dragon’s Breath Cave!—the odyssey of the King Fish stays with me—completely mysterious, completely splendid. These enormous and powerful fish have a unique custom: periodically, they gather together and leave the ocean to swim up the Mtentu River, deep into the interior. Once arrived at the place they seek, they gather into a vast ring and dance in a circle. And then they turn and go back to the ocean. No one knows why.

Except the King fish of course.

As I said, it made my jaw drop, just drop.

It reminds me of a recent story about an archaeological find in Turkey, Göbekli Tepe, a site of great age, built possibly 11 thousand years ago—whose elaborately carved monoliths imply a technology that seems impossible in a time when humans still lived in small hunter-gatherer groups.

And yet, there it stands.

Whenever you hear someone announcing that the science is settled, that he knows all the answers, ask him about the King fish’s dance. Ask him about Göbekli Tepe.

Read Full Post »

Not one to learn from experience, Jack once again tried to dislodge Bertie from his place on the bed. Once again, Bertie stood firm, once again I awoke in wroth, and tossed the wicked creature out, with a few choice words to speed him on his way. Well, Jack went galloping down the stairs and I heard him doing that mad rush from room to room which cats do from time to time. Then he slowly climbed the back up the stairs—but stopped at the door. He couldn’t get up the courage to reenter the scene of the crime. And he started to cry. Little cat cries of sorrow and distress. How could I withstand it? I came out, gathered him in my arms, assured him that I would not really be sending him to the Reform School for Bad Cats, and allowed him back on the bed, where he respectfully honored Bertie’s primary position. And all night long they loyally performed the traditional Task of the Cat, of keeping my legs pinned down and immobile.

Read Full Post »

The street in front of my office was lined with Barnum and Bailey circus trailers! Filled, one supposes, with sparkly costumes, trapeze equipment, clown noses. Possibly bears?

There is a charming statue in front of the fire station by my building: a fireman and his devoted dog. As I walked by, a lady went up the step to the statue, her wee white poodle on a leash behind her. He balked at the step, which towered over his tiny frizzled head. She cooed encouraging words, but he steadfastly refused. That poodle did NOT care for fine arts.

At the entrance to the subway, a young man stood with his large double bass, bowing away with a will. Unfortunately, the sound was drowned by the wind and the traffic.

doublebass

After work, I went to the grocery store, and then to the drug store. Which was CLOSED–?? There was a police car winking and blinking at the corner, and yellow police tapes strung about. As I drove past I saw a car had driven right INTO the store, and was nestled among the Easter candy and broken glass. A very impatient shopper, I suppose.

And today it’s snowing. On the first day of Spring.

Read Full Post »

It appears that Bertie finds all this FUSS about Sophie tiresome–so WHAT that she leaps upon tall furniture, so WHAT that she’s so naughty, so WHAT that she has the big fluffy tail. Bertie has his own spark of Divine Fire! He could do ALL those things (except the fluffy part) if he wanted to, but he doesn’t because he has a decent sense of what’s proper.
However, last night was the last straw, what with Sophie getting a long private cuddling session–all other cats excluded–and no cozy detective drama watching time.
When I came into the living room, Bertie calmly confronted me from the MANTEL PIECE. Forbidden to cats, because of dainty objets d’art.
.

He too can be naughty! He too has the cuteness! And his tail–while not FLUFFY–is a fine appendage!
After the obligatory protest–one must keep up appearances–I told Bertie that he was the king of the cats, and we spent some quality time together. Well, ANY time with Bertie is quality time.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: